Creature feature

Native orchid

Orchids

  One of the great joys of walking in Deep Creek Conservation Park is the diversity of flora you can encounter along the way. Of special note are the native orchids. There are more than 350 native orchids in South Australia and a significant number can be found in Deep Creek.     What makes these …

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Meet a popular resident of Deep Creek Conservation Park

  The yellow-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus funereus) is synonymous with Deep Creek and for many years it was the emblem for Southern Ocean Retreats. During the early 1990s their numbers were relatively low earning them a ‘vulnerable status’. Deep Creek Conservation Park was considered an important refuge and breeding ground but in more recent years …

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The Big Slow Moving Skink

Known by a variety of names including stumpy tail, sleepy lizard, shingleback and pinecone lizard the Tiliqua Rugosa is widespread in low rainfall areas as well as coastal parts of Western & South Australia. They favour coastal heath and sclerophyll forests which are abundant in Deep Creek Conservation Park. Although omnivorous their diet usually consists of flowers and leaves. However, …

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Wedgetail eagle a frequent flyer in Deep Creek Conservation Park

  The wedge tail eagle (Aquila Audax) is the largest bird of prey in Australia. Although they are found across the continent they favour lightly timbered and open country. The wedge tail is a common sight in Deep Creek with healthy numbers throughout the Park.  Females are bigger than males with wingspans typically between 180-230 …

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