Art, Dance & Sustainable living

Here are some of the highlights of activities planned for the Southern Fleurieu Peninsula in the coming weeks.  Be sure to mark these events in your calender:

 

 

CURIOUSER & CURIOUSER

Image result for karen hammat artist

As part of the annual South Australian Living Artists SALA festival, local artists Karen Hammat and Emanda Fretwell have teamed up to present an exhibition titled Curiouser & Curiouser?

 

Their vision is something like, Alice in Wonderland trips through a Boho Victorian parlour with mad, odd, intriguing and unusual results.

 

The works will be on display at Yankalilla Yarns Fine Art Gallery at the end of Glebe Ave in Yankalilla, from August 4th to 12th, 2018 between 10am and 4.30pm.

‘One of those days’ by Karen Hammat.

 

 

 

Yankalilla Bush Dance

Australia has a wonderful choice when it comes to folk dancing.  One style that has truly become Australian is Bush Dancing. The Yankalilla Show Hall is the perfect venue and for those new to it you’ll be a Bush Dancer by the end of the night. This event will be held on Saturday 11th August, 2018 7pm to late at The Yankalilla Show Hall, Main South Road Yankalilla.  Tickets: Adult $20, Concession $15, Child 16 and under $0.  Book online or at The Fleurieu Coast Visitor Centre 163 Main South Road Yankalilla or by Phone: 1300 965 842. Bar facilities available but BYO nibbles.

 

 

 

Festival of Nature

This 5-day festival seeks to inspire, empower and celebrate sustainable living through a vibrant program of open homes and gardens, pop-up workshops, talks, demonstrations and exhibits. And as if that’s not inspiring enough it is delivered against a backdrop of delicious local food & wine. The Festival of Nature commences at 9am, 5 September 2018 and for more details on each day’s itinerary contact 1300 965 842 or (08) 8558 0240.

 

The Short Beaked Echidna – a mammal like no other

Echidna, Deep Creek Conservation Park

Echidnas are regularly sighted in Deep Creek Conservation Park.

 

International visitors often comment on the unusual features of our wildlife

and with just cause; it is like no other.  The echidna is a prime example and

a frequently sighted resident of Deep Creek Conservation Park.

What makes it so special apart from its spines, bird-like beak and a pouch similar

to a kangaroo?  It is one of only a handful of egg laying mammals known as a monotreme.

The short beaked echidna lays a single egg and places it in their small

backward facing pouch where it hatches after 10 days to become a puggle.

 

New born Echidna

A newborn puggle. (Image courtesy Paul Fahy)

 

The puggle continues to grow inside the pouch until it develops spines.

At this point it is asked to vacate the premises and goes to live in a burrow

that the mother has built for a further 6 months.

The diet of the short beaked echidna typically includes ants,

termites, grubs, larvae and worms.  They can detect tiny electrical signals

from the insect’s body and use their sharp claws to dig up nests to reveal

invertebrates.  Once exposed the echidna licks them up with its tongue.

Echidnas are unable to perspire and in order to cope with summer

heat they avoid day time activities.  Their main threats are dogs and foxes.

 

short beaked echidna

Echidna Spines | by Evan Pickett

 

‘Girls’ Getaway Special

One recurring phenomenon which we have noticed over the

years is that women often enjoy staying with us as a group.

Whether it’s life-long friends who’ve known each other since kindergarten

or more recent bonds formed through a common interest, partners or

parenthood such groups regularly use our accommodation to just

unwind for a few days and nourish those friendships.

 

Deep Creek Homestead - lounge room. Southern Ocean Retreats

The cosy lounge with wood fire; a perfect place to share life’s events with your friends.

 

If this sounds like you and you have a group of friends you’d like to

get away with the Deep Creek Homestead is the perfect venue.

It can sleep up to 8 guests and is a spacious and secluded hideaway

from which to withdraw from the pressures of life for a few days.

To help ease you in to your blissful sense of relaxation we are

offering complimentary champagne for such bookings.

 

 

Image result for women toasting champagne

 

You will have a choice of either

a beautifully balanced creamy Leconfield Syn Rouge  Sparkling Shiraz

or the clean finish Syn Chardonnay Pinot Noir with its persistent mousse.

For a 2-night stay one bottle will be provided for every 2 guests with a

minimum of 4 guests and a maximum of 8.  To take advantage of this

effervescent offer call us on Tel 8598 4169 to secure your next girls only getaway.

 

Deep Creek – Park of the month in March

Boatharbour Cove panorama

A panoramic view of Boatharbour Cove

 

‘Park of the Month’ is an initiative that has been running across

South Australia’s national and marine parks since 2015.

  It encourages people to visit, explore and connect with nature.

 One park is chosen each month with a range of guided activities

and ideas of things to do for people over those 4 weeks.

 

Park Ranger Simon Oster in Deep Creek Conservation Park

Park Ranger Simon Oster at home in his ‘office’ in Deep Creek Conservation Park

 

Activities include ranger walks as well as activities specific to each park

such as; wildflower walks, planting days, kayaking, snorkelling, and bird watching.

For each park Nature Play SA create a ‘40 things’ to do resource, together

with 10 great ideas to encourage people to connect with parks each season.

Deep Creek will be Park of the Month in March this year with a number of events

planned including  ranger guided walks, talks presented by ecologists, and yoga in the forest.

 

 

Yoga in the Park? Zen again, why not.

Yoga in the Park?  Zen again, why not.

 

As part of these activities Southern Ocean Retreats is offering the chance

to win a stay at one of our properties.  For further information check out

the Park of the Month web page here or Parks SA Facebook page here.

 

 

Goondooloo Cottage

Goondooloo Cottage, a perennial favourite with our guests

The Southern Grass Tree

Anyone who has visited Deep Creek Conservation Park would know

that it is synonymous with the Southern Grass Tree (Xanthorrehoea Australis)

The District Council of Yankalilla has used it as its logo for many years.

But did you know that these grass trees are slow growing and long lived with

some estimated to be 450 years old.

 

Yaccas in Stringybark Forest

A feast of Yaccas in the Stringybark Forest

  In fact, the rough trunk only develops after many

years of growth.  Its typical black appearance is the result of exposure to bushfires over decades.

The reason the tree usually survives a fire is that its living growth-point

is buried underground, protected by a tightly packed leaf base.

 

Growth rates, although hard to quantify, have been estimated at between 1-3 cm per year.

Flowering takes several years and does not happen annually.

However, after bushfires up to 80% of grass trees will flower producing

a single spear-like cream coloured stem that can reach up to 3m in height.

 

Flowering Yaccas at Cobbler Hill with Kangaroo Island in the background

Flowering Yaccas at Cobbler Hill with Kangaroo Island in the background

The Southern grasstree was an important plant for Aborigines, both as a source

of food and drink as well as for fibre and materials for tool and weapon construction.

The flowering stem, when soaked in water, produces a sweet drink

while it also releases a resin that was used as a glue when making tools.

Stems could also be used as part of a spear or as a base for fire making

implements and the tough seed pods were used as cutting implements.

 

The distinctive leaves of grass trees are captivating

The distinctive leaves of grass trees are captivating

 

European settlers used the resin to produce a lacquer for furniture.

Grass trees are also known as ‘yacca’, which is likely derived from

a South Australian Aboriginal language, mostly likely Kaurna.

Today you can marvel at the majesty of these great survivors

from the comfort of your patio at the Ridgetop Retreats.

 

Xanthorrehoea at Ridgetop Retreats

Watch the leaves of the Yacca dance to the tune of the wind from your patio